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Child protection practice is multi-leveled. Public agencies are created and regulated by federal and state legislation and administrative rules. Many public agencies are further regulated by accreditation standards to which they voluntarily subscribe. Collectively, these laws, rules, and standards are the foundation for the basic practice level in the new child protection paradigm.

The agencies develop or adopt criteria used to measure the success of internal programs and services. These quantitative performance targets shape the intermediate practice level in the new child protection paradigm.

Agencies adopt principles they believe should govern programs and services. These are basic truths or assumptions against which the work of the agency is judged. Only when practice conforms to these principles is practice considered fully appropriate and successful. This perspective shapes the advanced level in the new child protection paradigm.

Figure 1: The New Child Protection Paradigm

 

 

Basic Practice

 

Intermediate Practice

 

Advanced Practice

 

A.

 

Rules

 

 

Outcomes

 

 

Principles

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

B.

 

Procedures

 

 

Continuous Invention

 

 

Best Practice

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

C.

 

Bureaucracy

 

 

Empowerment

 

 

Professional Judgment

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

D.

 

Safety

 

 

Permanence

 

 

Sustained Well-being

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

E.

 

Staff-determined

 

 

Services-determined

 

 

Protocol-determined

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

F.

 

Program-centered

 

 

Family-centered

 

 

Community-centered

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

G.

 

Agency-focused

 

 

Network-focused

 

 

Variable Resource-focused

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

H.

 

Closed Structures

 

 

Open Structures

 

 

Dynamic Structures

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

I.

 

Collaboration

 

 

Partnering

 

 

Unified Commitment

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

J.

 

Quality Assurance

 

 

Continuous Quality Improvement

 

 

Values-centered Practice

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

K.

 

Cost

 

 

Process

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

L.

 

Authority

 

 

Assessment & Planning

 

 

Rights & Responsibilities

 

 

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

TOT

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

SC

 

0______

 

1______

 

2______

 

3______

 

4______

 

5______

 

Practice Rating ________

Figure 1 summarizes the new child protection paradigm. The left set of elements represents the basic practice level. The middle set of elements represents the intermediate practice level and the right set of elements represents the advanced practice level. The following twelve workbook sections (A-L) discuss the new child protection paradigm in relation to the twelve element clusters included across the rows of Figure 1.

At the end of each section, you are invited to rate your practice, your agency, or a specific department or program. Circle the number on the scale best characterizing where practice currently falls along the scale.

The scale ranges from 0 to 5. “0” indicates practice has not incorporated the first element in the cluster and “1” indicates it has. “2” indicates the middle element is partially but not completely integrated into practice and “3” indicates it is fully integrated. “4” indicates the third element in the cluster is partially but not completely integrated into practice and “5” indicates it is fully integrated.

When you have completed the scales at the ends of all twelve sections, here is how to find the score for your practice, program, or agency.

  1. At the ends of sections A: – L:, look at the number you circled on the chart. Find the corresponding number in Figure 1. Put a checkmark beside that number.

For example, If in section A: you circled “4” to indicate Principles are partially but not completely integrated into practice, put a checkmark beside the “4” in the row below “A” in Figure 1.

  1. Once you have put a checkmark in each of rows A: through L: in Figure 1, count the number of checkmarks in each column and put the total beside the appropriate number in the “TOT” row. That lets you see, at a glance, the number of checkmarks you have for each practice level across the row.
  2. On the TOT row, multiply each printed number by the number you entered beside of it. Write the answer on the appropriate blank in the “SC” row.

For example, If you have 5 checkmarks in the “3” column in Figure 1, you put a “5” beside the “3” in the TOT row. You multiply 3 times 5 and get 15. You then write “15” beside the “3” in the “SC” row.

  1. Below Figure 1, there is a blank to record the “Practice Level.” Add together the numbers you have written on the “SC” row of Figure 1. Write the total (0 to 60) on the “Practice Level” blank. That is the current practice level for your practice, program, or agency. Here is how to interpret your rating.

0 to 20 = Basic Practice Level

21 to 40 = Intermediate Practice Level

41 to 60 = Advanced Practice Level

(Note) In each section, A: – L:, there are “Study Questions.” The questions reflect basic, intermediate, and advanced practice levels. This means you may not have an appropriate answer for some of the study questions. This is not a problem. Simply skip any question for which you do not have an appropriate answer at this time

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